Purina® Goat Nutrition E—Newsletter


FEATURED STORY | Janet Cooper: 2-G Farm

Janet Cooper started raising goats 20 years ago when her uncle gave her a few brush goats he received as payment but didn't want. As Janet began to learn more about her goats, she started breeding. She later added a Boer buck and an Alpine Cross to her herd. In 2001, Janet purchased her first purebred Nubians and fell in love.

"I love their temperament and long ears," said Janet. "I started milking them and loved the milk, too."

Now, Janet only raises purebred Nubians and has about 25 goats, including kids and bucks, on her small farm in Saucier, Mississippi.

"You don't need a lot of land for goats, although I wish I had a little bit more," Janet said.

Her favorite goat is a doe named Jazz. Goat 1

"She's special and always gives me kisses," said Janet.

As her goats began to produce more milk than she could use, Janet started to sell the excess from her farm.

"Goat milk is really great for babies that can't tolerate formula or breast milk, so I'm glad I can help," Janet said.

Janet milks every day except for a few weeks around Thanksgiving to get milk for drinking, selling and to make cheese and kefir. You can find two of her cheese recipes at the end of this story. Two of Janet's goats made Top Ten Milk production on Dairy Herd Improvement through the American Dairy Goat Association.

In addition to breeding and milking, Janet shows her goats a few times a year. She has won three grand champion and three reserve grand champion awards, as well as one best buck in show.

Janet feeds her bucks and kids Noble Goat® Grower 16 and her milking does Noble Goat® Dairy Parlor 16 along with alfalfa and peanut hay. Additionally, she uses Purina Mills HIGH OCTANE® Fitter 35 Topdress as a supplement for her heavy milkers and older goats to help keep weight on.

CHEDDAR GOAT CHEESE

  1. Pasteurize 2 gallons goat milk.
    Heat to 165° F and hold temperature for 30 seconds. (Always use Stainless Steel Pots.)
  2. Cool milk to 86° F while stirring (If already cooled down, warm to 86°.)
  3. Add 1 Mesophilic (C101) culture & mix well.
  4. Let set, Undisturbed, for 30 minutes.
  5. Add 1/4 rennet tablet or 3/4 tsp. liquid rennet to 1/4 cup water. Add rennet/water mixture to goat milk mixture. Mix well—at least 1 minute, and then stop all milk movements.
  6. Let set, undisturbed, for 1 hour.
    *It is ready when you see a clean break when a clean finger is inserted and lifted.
  7. Using a stainless steel knife, cut the curd into 1/2 inch cubes, making diagonal slices 1/2" apart, and again at right angles, then slanted at 45° F.
  8. Let set, undisturbed, for 10 minutes at 86° F.
  9. Raise the temperature of the curd 2° F degrees every 5 minutes to between 98-100° F. Stir gently often. While stirring cut any larger curds into small even curds. Maintain the 98-100°F temperature for another 45 minutes. Continue to stir often.
  10. Pour the curds into a colander lined with cheesecloth.
  11. Pour curds into a 2 pound cheese mold lined with cheese cloth. Then Press the cheese at 20 pounds of pressure for 15 minutes. Flip the cheese and press at 30 pounds pressure for 1 hour. Flip the cheese again and press at 50 pounds pressure for 12 hours.
  12. Remove the cheese from the press and gently remove the cheese cloth.
  13. Rub salt on all surfaces of the cheese.
  14. Allow to age at 50° F. Rub salt on the cheese once a day for the next two days. Turn the cheese daily. It will take three to five days to dry.
  15. When the surface is dry, it may be waxed. The cheese should then be turned daily. It can be eaten after aging for 1 month but improves in flavor if aged longer.
FETA GOAT CHEESE
  1. Pasteurize 2 gallons goat milk.
    Heat to 165° F and hold temperature for 30 seconds. (Always use Stainless Steel Pots.)
  2. Cool milk to 86° F while stirring (If already cooled down, warm to 86°.)
  3. Add 1 Mesophilic (C101) culture & mix well.
  4. Let set, Undisturbed, for 30 minutes.
  5. Add 1/4 rennet tablet or 3/4 tsp. liquid rennet to 1/4 cup water. Add rennet/water mixture to goat milk mixture. Mix well—at least 1 minute, and then stop all milk movements.
  6. Let set, undisturbed, for 1 hour.
    *It is ready when you see a clean break when a clean finger is inserted and lifted.
  7. Using a stainless steel knife, cut the curd into 1/2 inch cubes, making diagonal slices 1/2" apart, and again at right angles, then slanted at 45° F.
  8. Let set, undisturbed, for 10 minutes at 86° F.
  9. Raise the temperature of the curd 2° F degrees every 5 minutes to between 98-100° F. Stir gently often. While stirring cut any larger curds into small even curds. Maintain the 98-100° F temperature for another 45 minutes. Continue to stir often.
  10. Pour the curds into a colander lined with cheesecloth.
  11. Hang and let drain 6 hours.
  12. Remove from bag and slice into 1 inch slices, then cut the slices into 1 inch cubes.
  13. Sprinkle the cubes with three or four tablespoons coarse flake salt.
  14. Place in covered container and allow to age, in refrigerator, for at least three days.
If you would like contact Janet about her goats, milk or cheese, visit www.2-gfarm.com.

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GOAT TIPS | Poisonous Plants and Goats

Stomach of steel? Not quite. Although known for being able to eat just about anything, there are actually many plants that can make a goat sick or even cause death. Poisonous plants can be eaten by accident, but in most cases it's because of lack of other available forage sources. Goats become so hungry that they eat large amounts of plants they normally wouldn't.

Due to the huge variety of geographical differences with regard to toxic plants, it is recommended that you contact your veterinarian and/or local agricultural extension office to get a complete listing of toxic plants in your area.

Read below to learn about some basic types of poisonous plants.

ALKALOID CONTAINING PLANTS
Because these plants have a bitter taste, most animals avoid eating them; however, some animals eat them by mistake, often in early spring when the plants are very green. Alkaloids usually don't dissolve in water or alcohol, can form salts and exhibit a pharmacological action like nicotine, morphine or quinine.

CYANOGENIC PLANTS
Under certain conditions, such as when they are damaged or frozen, these plants can contain hydrocyanic acid, a deadly poison that interferes with the blood's ability to carry oxygen.

GLYCOSIDE-CONTAINING PLANTS
Glycosides are molecules in which a sugar is bound to a non-carbohydrate. Many plants store chemicals in inactive glycosides, which are activated during a chemical process called hydrolysis that causes the sugar part to break off, making the chemical available for use.

PLANTS THAT CAUSE MECHANICAL INJURY
Some plants and shrubs have physical characteristics, such as thorns, that can hurt your goat. Although your goat might be able to eat them, once they do, punctures and tears can occur internally. Other plants twine or bind when digested causing difficulties in the intestines.

SAPONIN-CONTAINING PLANTS
Saponin forms a frothy or foamy substance when mixed with water. It's often used as a detergent.

PHOTOSENSITIZING PLANTS
These plants generally only cause issues for goats with light or white skin. After ingesting these plants, your goat is more susceptible to sunburn and heat related illnesses. Although not all are extremely harmful, depending on climate and light conditions, they can still be quite dangerous.

TANNIC ACID-CONTAINING PLANTS
Tannic acid is most commonly found in oak leaves and acorns.

RESIN-CONTAINING PLANTS
Many landscaping plants are poisonous, so check your yard before getting a goat and research any new plants before planting.

If your goat does happen to eat a poisonous plant, follow these steps to provide the best chance of recovery:

  1. Prevent your goat from eating anymore of the plant.
  2. Isolate your goat and provide plenty of water.
  3. Avoid stressing your goat.
  4. Get a sample of the plant you suspect your goat ate to help in diagnosis.
  5. Call your veterinarian immediately for diagnosis and treatment.

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GET TO KNOW | Noble Goat® Range Cube 20

Noble Goat® Range Cube 20 is a large pelleted supplement formulated for the optimum growth, development and maintenance of goats. It is designed to meet the needs of goats on range or pasture and delivers the nutrition and performance you expect. The ingredients found in all Noble Goat® products are carefully selected based on Purina's expert research, so you know that you're getting quality, productivity, and value in each bag.

  • Nutritionally balanced—Provides high-quality proteins, vitamins, minerals and other nutrients to enhance performance on range or pasture
  • Goat specific mineral fortification—Balanced calcium to phosphorus ratio helps to maintain the exacting needs of goats
  • Palatable—high quality ingredients assures top performance and goat acceptability
  • "Cube" feed form—easy to handle and manage with large acreage or large herds

Remember that feed consumption will vary with life stage, environment, and activity. Also, be sure adequate amounts of fresh, clean water are always available. This product is available regionally, so check with your Purina® dealer for ordering details.

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